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American Sociological Association


Public Data Resources for Sociologists Continued

26. Reproductive Statistics Branch: Natality Data
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Presenter: Stephanie J. Ventura, Reproductive Statistics Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Room 820, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2003; phone: (301) 458-4547; fax: (301) 458-4033; email: SVentura@cdc.gov.

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) collects and publishes information on a wide variety of demographic and health characteristics reported on the birth certificate for all births occurring in the United States. Information from birth certificates registered in the health departments of all states, New York City, the District of Columbia, and the territories, is provided to NCHS through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Data are collected continuously. NCHS publishes preliminary and final data reports annually. Public-use data files are available beginning with the 1968 data year; a compressed data file is available on CD-ROMs for data years 1990-98. A variety of special reports is available on specific topics, including most recently, teenage birth patterns, pregnancy rates, attendant at birth, method of delivery, obstetric interventions, twin and triplet births, smoking during pregnancy, and Hispanic-origin births. Demographic characteristics available in the natality file include age, race, Hispanic origin, education, birthplace, marital status, residence, live-birth order, sex, and month and day of birth. Health information includes month prenatal care began, number of prenatal visits, medical risk factors, tobacco use, alcohol use, obstetric procedures, attendant at birth, place of delivery, method of delivery, complications of labor and/or delivery, period of gestation, birthweight, Apgar score, abnormal conditions of the newborn, congenital anomalies, and plurality.

27. Mortality Statistics Branch: Mortality Data
Division of Vital Statistics
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Presenter: Donna L. Hoyert, Mortality Statistics Branch, Division of Vital Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Room 820, Hyattsville, MD 20782; phone: (301) 458-4279; fax: (301) 458-4034; e-mail: dlh7@cdc.gov; homepage: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/dvs/mortdata.htm/.

Selected mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) will be profiled. National, state and local mortality data from NCHS are available from vital records filed in each of the states for deaths of all ages, including infants. Similar data is available for fetal deaths, and the linked file combines birth and death data.

Data are released in publications, tapes, CD-ROMS, CDC WONDER (a general-purpose health and communications system that can be accessed via the world wide web), and the Internet. Beginning with data for 1999 deaths, the latest classification of deaths and a new standard population will be implemented. These changes have implications for comparisons with data for previous years.

28. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
Division of Health Care Statistics, Ambulatory Care Statistics Branch
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Presenter: David Woodwell, Division of Health Care Statistics, Ambulatory Care Statistics Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Room 952, Hyattsville, MD 20782: phone: (301) 458-4592; fax: (301) 458-4032; email: daw0@cdc.gov; homepage: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/ahcd/ahcd1.htm/.

The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), conducted periodically from 1973-85 and annually since 1989, collects data on a sample of visits from a national sample of non-federal, office-based physicians. In 1998, data were collected on approximately 23,000 visits from 2,500 physicians. The survey provides information on the characteristics of the patient, the physician practice, and the visit. The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), conducted annually since 1992, collects similar data from a national sample of emergency (ED) and outpatient departments (OPD) in general and short-stay hospitals. In 1998, data were collected on approximately 24,000 ED visits and 29,000 OPD visits. Data from the NAMCS and NHAMCS can be combined to obtain a comprehensive picture of ambulatory medical care utilization.

29. Data Dissemination Branch
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Presenter: Linda R. Washington and Tammy Stewart-Prather, Data Dissemination Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Room 1064, Hyattsville, MD 20785; phone: (301) 458-4526 (Prather), (301) 458-4558 (Washington); fax: (301) 458-4027; e-mail: lrwl@cdc.gov and TMS2@cdc.gov; homepage: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.

This poster session will feature the latest health data available from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Data are available from NCHS in published form and electronically, including public-use data files, CD-ROMs, diskettes, and through the Internet. Handouts of various products will be made available during the session.

30. National Survey of Family Growth
Reproductive Statistics Branch
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Presenter: Joyce Abma, Reproductive Statistics Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2003; phone: (301) 458-4058; fax: (301) 458-4033; e-mail: jza2@cdc.gov; homepage: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/.

The 1995 The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is a comprehensive data set of women's fertility in the United States. The NSFG has been conducted 5 times since 1973, resulting in a cross-sectional time-series for 1973, 1976, 1982, 1988, and 1995. The NSFG has always included complete birth and pregnancy histories, and detailed information on contraceptive method use. The 1995 cycle expanded its event-history coverage into domains of work, education, cohabitation, and sexual partners. Computer-assisted personal interviews of 10,847 women ages 15-44 are supplemented with information collected using Audio Computer Assisted Self Interview (ACASI) technology. The 1995 NSFG includes a rich contextual data file and other supplementary files. Plans for the next NSFG, to be conducted in 2001, includes interviewing 7,200 males and 11,800 females.

31. The National Health Interview Survey
Division of Health Interview Statistics
National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Presenter: J. Neil Russell, Ph.D., Division of Health Interview Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Room 850 Hyattsville, MD 20782; phone: (301) 458-4470; fax: (301) 458-4035; email: jkr9@cdc.gov; homepage: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm/.

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The NHIS is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian, non-institutionalized household population of the United States. The NHIS has been conducted continuously since 1957. The data are used to monitor major health trends and to evaluate federal health policies. In 1997, the NHIS underwent a major questionnaire revision to improve the relevance of the data; for example, the survey now includes annual data on expanded socio-demographics, family relationships, income resources, health insurance, and health care access. Public use data from the NHIS are released annually via CD-ROM and the Internet.

32. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Division of Adult and Community Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Presenter: Deborah Holtzman, Division of Adult and Community Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mailstop K-47, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Atlanta, GA 30341; phone: (770) 488-2466; fax: (770) 488-8150; e-mail: DXH4@CDC.GOV; homepage: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp.brfss/

This exhibit features the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a unique, state-based surveillance system, currently active in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and three U.S. territories. For almost two decades, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with state health departments has conducted telephone surveys of U.S. adults to estimate the prevalence of behaviors linked to specific health problems. The BRFSS was designed to gather information on behaviors, practices, and attitudes related to issues such as, health status and access to care, tobacco and alcohol use, dietary patterns, physical activity, injury control, women's health, use of clinical preventive services, and HIV. Every month, a representative sample of persons 18 years and older is selected for interview in each participating state and territory. The BRFSS provides data for many purposes including assessing risks for chronic diseases, identifying sociodemographic patterns and trends in health-related behaviors, designing and monitoring health interventions and services, addressing emerging health issues, and measuring progress toward achieving state and national health objectives.

33. Census Data in the Classroom: The Social Science Data Analysis Network
Presenter: William Frey, 2nd Floor, 1250 Fourth Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401 phone or fax: (888) 257-7244; email: bill.frey@usa.net ; homepage: www.ssdan.net/.

This exhibit provides an overview of workbooks, computer diskettes, Internet, and on-line access to undergraduate teaching materials available through the Social Science Data Analysis Network (SSDAN). Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Network enables college teachers to introduce "user-friendly" analysis of census data in their classes. Tailor-made data sets, from the 1950 through 1990 U.S. Censuses, and the 1999 Current Population Survey, can be used in a variety of social science classes dealing with topics such as: race/ethnicity, immigration, gender studies, marriage, households and poverty, income inequality, children, the elderly and others. SSDAN staff will help instructors tailor exercises for classes.

34. Public Data Queries, Inc.
Presenter: Albert F. Anderson, Public Data Queries, Inc., 310 Depot Street, Suite C, Ann Harbor, Michigan 48104; phone: (734) 213-4964 x309; fax: (734) 475-8160; e-mail: afa@pdq.com; homepage: http://www.pdq.com/.

Public Data Queries, Inc., formed in 1993 and funded in part by small business grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA), will demonstrate PDQ-Explore, a data information system that provides interactive access to very large microdata files such as the Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) and Current Population Surveys (CPS) from the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Tabulations, summary statistics, correlations, and extracts can be generated in seconds from data sets with record counts ranging to tens of millions.

35-37. Population Division Surveys
U.S. Census Bureau
Presenters: Kurt Bauman, Ken Bryson, Barbara Downs, Jason Fields, Tammany Mulder, and Kristen Smith, U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, Washington, DC 20233; phone: (301) 457-2422; e-mail: pop@census.gov; homepage: http://www.census.gov/.

Representatives from the Population Division of the U.S. Census Bureau present information about five of its major data resources: The Current Population Survey, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Survey of Program Dynamics, the American Community Survey, and the Population Estimates and Projections Program. We provide specific information about each data source, including: survey design, advantages of each data source, types of datafiles available, reports written from each source, and relevant Census Bureau website locations of additional information.

38. Consortium of Social Science Associations and Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics
Presenter: David Hess, Consortium of Social Science Associations, 1522, K Street, NW, Suite 836, Washington, DC 20005; phone: (202) 842-3525; fax: (202) 842-2788; email: dahess@erols.com; homepage; http://members.aol.com/socscience/COSSAindex.htm/. Also, David Hess for Edward Spar, Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics, 1429 Duke Street, Suite 402, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone: (703) 836-0404; fax: (703) 684-2037; e-mail: copafs@aol.com; homepage: http://members.aol.com/copafs/index.htm/.

The Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics (COPAFS) is an independent organization established to act as an advocate for the development and dissemination of high-quality federal statistics. Through COPAFS, members have an opportunity to review and have an impact on issues including timeliness, quality, confidentiality, and relevance. One of the major goals is to make members of the federal statistical agencies aware of the needs of data users. COPAFS identifies areas where improvements are needed on federal statistical programs and suggests strategies to bring about these improvements. (The American Sociological Association is an active member of COPAFS.)

The Consortium of Social Sciences Association (COSSA) was established as an advocacy organization in 1981 and is supported by more than 100 professional associations, scientific societies, universities, and research institutes. COSSA stands alone in representing the full range of social scientists. COSSA lobbies Congress and the Executive Branch on issues affecting the social and behavioral science portfolios of the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Education, Justice, and Labor, and many other federal agencies. (The American Sociological Association is a founding member of COSSA and serves on its Executive Committee.)

39. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
University of Minnesota, History Department
Presenters: Catherine Fitch and Susan Brower, University of Minnesota, History Department, 614 Social Science Building, 267 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455; phone: (612) 624-5818; fax: (612) 624-7096; email: fitch@hist.umn.edu; homepage: http://www.ipums.umn.edu/.

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) consists of 25 high-precision samples of the American population drawn from thirteen federal censuses, spanning 1850 to 1990. The IPUMS assigns uniform codes across all the samples and brings relevant documentation into a coherent form to facilitate analysis of social and economic change. All data and documentation are available from the above website address.

40. American FactFinder
U.S. Census Bureau
Presenter: JR Wycinsky, U.S. Census Bureau, Marketing Services Office, Room 3019-3, Washington, DC 20233-0800; phone: (301) 457-3110; fax: (301) 457-2778; e-mail: David.l.wycinsky.jr@ccmail.census.gov.

The American FactFinder, or AFF, is the Census Bureau's main on-line data dissemination tool. Located on the Census Bureau homepage at http://www.census.gov, AFF is rapidly evolving to become the one place to find all the demographic, economic, and other statistics that users need. In this session, you will learn how to navigate through AFF's six main user areas: Community Profiles, Population and Housing Facts, Products, Maps, Industry and Business Facts, and the Search function. In addition to a general overview of AFF, users will get a sneak preview of the next generation American FactFinder, which should be available around the end of 2000.




Last Updated on January 08, 2005