Summer 2005

(pdf version 112kb)

In this Newsletter...

  • A Message from the SOE Chair, James Rosenbaum
  • No Child Left Behind Conference 2005- Organization
  • SOE Award Ceremony & Dinner
  • Section on Sociology of Education Sessions
  • 2005 SOE Section Business Meeting
  • 2005 ASA Sociology of Education Paper Sessions
  • 2005 ASA Sociology of Education Section Roundtables
  • Announcements

  • A Message from the Section Chair, James Rosenbaum

    I am happy to report some of the accomplishments of our section this year. First, Carl Schmitt reports that SOE web site receives 7,000 to 10,000 hits per month. That is amazing.

    Part of the reason may be the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) conference. There has been a lot of interest outside our section. Much of the reaction to NCLB has been ideological, with little attention to data, actual mechanisms, and larger social context factors. Our discipline has a lot to offer and I think the conference papers illustrate that. I hope a lot of people will attend the NCLB conference on August 12. The section will have access to two rooms from 8:30am to 5:30pm on August 12: Philadelphia Loews Hotel, Washington B, third floor (initially) and Washington C, third floor.

    At a meeting of State Superintendents of Education, some superintendents hinted at shortcomings of NCLB, but all seemed totally committed to using outcome measures to monitor successes and failures and to identify areas for making improvements. Of course, most Sociologists of Education have long been committed to examining outcomes, rather than inputs, as a way to assess educational programs. Moreover, an emphasis on discerning outcomes for disadvantaged groups is also a goal our field has encouraged. There are many problems with NCLB in particular and accountability in general, yet in some ways both arise from some of the central ideas that evolved in our field over the past several decades so we ought to have something to say about it.

    The idea for the conference came at the suggestion of Kevin Dougherty. Kevin, Kathy Borman, and I assisted in reviewing papers. However, Alan Sadovnik made it happen; he solicited papers, obtained funding from AIR, and organized sessions and discussants. George Bohrnstedt and Laura Salganik at AIR are to be thanked for helping us obtain funding for the conference.

    Our section now has 707 numbers, down from 718 in 2004. We will continue to get 4 sessions in 2006 for that number. We need 800 members to get another session.

    The operation of the section depends on many people who deserve the gratitude of all 707 of us. Gary Dworkin has handled membership, Tom Hoffer has put together the section newsletter. Amy Binder and Rob Warren oversaw the enormous and enormously important task of selecting papers for the section's sessions for the ASA annual meetings. Annette Lareau selected papers for the sociology of Education Sessions, and managed to get 8 additional sessions, when she initially only had one. As a result of their efforts, there will be many sessions this year. You can find them listed below in this newsletter and also on the ASA website, by selecting sessions by "subject" and typing in "Education."

    Thanks go also to Barbara Heyns, the chair of the Willard Waller prize and her committee: Brian Powell, Barbara Schneider and Julia Wrigley, and to Sam Lucas, the chair of the David Stevenson prize and his committee, Stefanie DeLuca, Eric Grodsky, and Amanda E. Lewis. When ASA reminded me that we needed nominees, and gave me too little time to get that done, Richard Arum generously accepted my request to be the chair of the nominations committee with the assistance of Chandra Muller and did the process well and in record time. George Farkas was a secretary-treasurer. Special thanks go to Janet Asner at ASA who got us rooms for the NCLB conference.

    Sara Goldrick-Rab and David Karen used their expertise to find us a place to meet for dinner August 13, and Sara is organizing the arrangements.

    The section is particularly indebted to Carl Schmidt who rescued our web site. The U.S. Department of Education stopped providing programming support this year, and Carl stepped in and mastered the operation of the web site. Through his heroic efforts, our web site is operational again.

    Finally, a personal note. What most amazed me was the extreme dedication of section members to the work of the section. Unlike other situations where I've had to request help for some committee activity, I experienced no reluctance and no grumbling. Everyone whom I asked was eager to contribute to the section. That eagerness to make the section successful is perhaps the most impressive evidence of the strength of this section. It was a great honor to be a part of that.

    PLEASE NOTE a minor change in program: To save everyone an extra hour of sleep, I am scheduling the SOE Business Meeting for 9:30 am. That puts it just before the 10:30 roundtables, but NOT at 8:30, as in the schedule.

    REMINDER: The SOE awards ceremony will be at the dinner Saturday, August 13 2005, 7:30-10:30 PM. Please contact Sara Goldrick-Rab ASAP. The notice is below.

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    NCLB Conference 2005 - Organization:

    SOE Section No Child Left Behind Conference
    ASA Annual Meeting, Philadelphia
    August 12, 2005

    Philadelphia Loews Hotel, Washington B and Washington C, third floor

    Organizers:


    Alan R. Sadovnik, Rutgers University (contact at sadovnik@andromeda.rutgers.edu about attending)
    Kathryn Borman, University of South Florida
    Kevin Dougherty, Teachers College, Columbia University
    James Rosenbaum, Northwestern University


    Keynote Address

    9:00-9:50

    Chair: Alan R. Sadovnik, Rutgers University

    James Nevels, Chair, Philadelphia School Reform Commission and Swarthmore Group, Urban School Reform and the Reduction of the Achievement Gap: Federal Involvement, NCLB and its Place in Philadelphia School Reform

    10:00-11:20

     

    Concurrent Sessions

    •  Accountability and Assessment Issues I

    Chair and Discussant: Tamela McNulty Eitle, University of Miami

    •  Douglas B. Downey, Paul T. von Hippel and Melanie Hughes , Ohio State University, Are failing schools really failing: Using seasonal comparisons to evaluate school effectiveness

    •  Christopher B. Swanson, Double standards for graduation rate accountability or none? NCLB and the graduation gap

    •  Accountability and Assessment Issues II

    Chair and Discussant: Barbara Schneider, University of Chicago

    •  John Robert Warren , University of Minnesota , Eric S. Grodsky , U niversity of California – Davis, Jennifer C. Lee , University of Minnesota & Rachael B. Kulick , University of Minnesota, Should we expand NCLB into the high schools? Evidence from 25 years of state high school exit examinations

    •  Kathryn Schiller, SUNY Albany and Chandra Muller, University of Texas, Getting Left Further Behind: Coursetaking, Curriculum and Increasing Disparities within Schools.

    Concurrent Sessions

    11:30-12:50

    •  Social Reactions to High-Stakes Accountability

    Chair: Laura Salganik, AIR

    •  Jennifer Booher-Jennings,Columbia University and Andrew Beveridge, Queens College, CUNY, Gains, strains, gaming and results: A longitudinal assessment of the Houston Independent School District's response to the Texas accountability system and NCLB

    •  Gary Dworkin and John Lorence, University of Houston, Gaming NCLB: The effects of tokenism on the achievement of students in Texas schools

    •  Katie Weitz White, Northwestern University, Inside the black box: Sociological mechanisms affecting professional deviance, student classification and school culture

    •  Parental Involvement Issues

    Chair and Discussant: Thomas Smith, Vanderbilt University

    •  J oyce L. Epstein and Steven B. Sheldon, Johns Hopkins University , Research meets policy and practice: How well are schools and districts addressing NCLB requirements for parental involvement?

    •  Timothy Madigan, Mansfield University of Pennsylvania, Who wants NCLB: Variation in opinion towards the New Federal Education Policy

    1:00-2:00 Lunch

    Concurrent Sessions

    2:00-3:20

    •  High Quality Teachers Issues

    Chair and Discussant: Maureen Hallinan, University of Notre Dame

    •  Richard Ingersoll, University of Pennsylvania, NCLB and teacher quality

    •  Joan Talbert, Stanford University, Developing the teaching profession: Learning to improve student achievement

    •  Case Study: Federal Involvement and Local School Reform

    Chair and Discussant: David Karen, Bryn Mawr College

    •  Elizabeth Useem, et al., Research for Action, NCLB and Philadelphia school reform

    •  Jeanne Powers, Arizona State University and Carl Hermanns, Harvard University, Can we leave no child and school behind: An analysis of the Eugene school district's effort to create a more equitable school choice policy

    3:30-4:50

    •  School Choice Issues

    Chair: Janelle Scott, NYU

    •  Douglas Lauen, University of Chicago, The implications of school choice research for understanding the “exit option” in NCLB

    •  Roslyn Mickelson, UNC-Charlotte, When Opting Out is not a Choice. Implications for NCLB's Transfer Option from Charlotte

    •  Mark Berends and Anna Nicotera, Vanderbilt University, Examination of Intra-District student movement in the context of Federal transfer policies

    5:00-6:30

    •  Conclusion: Federal Involvement, NCLB and the Reduction of the Achievement Gap

    Chair and Discussant: Adam Gamoran, University of Wisconsin

    •  David Armor, George Mason University, Can NCLB close the achievement gap?

    •  Mary Metz, University of Wisconsin, Madison, NCLB as a tool to build the myth of a single ‘American' school system

    •  David Levinson, President, Norwalk Community College, NCLB: A Higher Education response.

     


    SOE AWARD CEREMONY & DINNER

    Saturday, August 13 th , 2005

    It's that time of year again! You are invited to the annual Sociology of Education Section dinner, this time in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the American Sociological Association. We will dine at the elegant Bistro St. Tropez overlooking the scenic Schuykill River in Philadelphia.

    This French bistro has created a lovely 3 course menu for us, including a choice of appetizer and entree (fish, chicken, or veg), and dessert, for an all-inclusive price of $49.50. The bistro is located at 2400 Market Street, walking distance or a short bus ride from the conference. Space at the dinner is limited to 130, so please make your reservation now by sending your checks payable to Sara Goldrick-Rab, Department of Educational Policy Studies, UW-Madison, 210 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall, Madison WI 53706. For further details on the menu, please see the attached invitation. Organizers Sara Goldrick-Rab and David Karen look forward to seeing you there!!


    Section on Sociology of Education Sessions

     
    ASA-SOE Planning Matrix (Locations listed in the Final Program)

    Saturday 8/13

    Sunday 8/14

    Monday 8/15

    Tuesday 8/16

    8:30 AM

    (9:30 start time ) Council and Business Meetings

    Paper Session: Primary Education in the United States

    Paper Session: Current Controversies: Gender, Math, and Science

    10:30 AM

    SOE roundtables

    Paper Session:   Race and Inequality: Looking at Schools

     

    Paper Session: Colleges and Their Consequences

    12:30 PM

    Paper Session: Ideology and Institutions: The Case of Schools

    2:30 PM

    Paper Session: Post-Secondary Education In The United States

    Paper Session: Oppositional Culture: Dynamics Surrounding Race in Schools

    Thematic Session: Explaining Racial Variations in Educational Achievement
     

    Paper Session: Cultures and Educational Institutions

    4:30 PM

    Paper Session: Comparative & Historical Perspectives on the State & Formal Educational Institutions

    6:30 PM

    7:30 PM

    SOE Awards, Reception & Dinner

     


     

    ======================================================

    Saturday, August 13

    Section on Sociology of Education Council and Business Meetings


    Session type: Meeting
    Time: Sat, Aug 13 - 9:30am - 10:30am  NOTE TIME CHANGE

    Building: Philadelphia Marriott

    ======================================================

    2005 ASA SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION SECTION PAPER SESSIONS

    PAPER SESSION: POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    Saturday, August 13 from 2:30pm to 4:10pm (Philadelphia Marriott)

    Presider: Regina Deil-Amen (Penn State University)

    Discussant: Mitchell L. Stevens (New York University)

    1. Katherine L. Hughes (Columbia University), Melinda Mechur Karp (Teachers College), Baranda Fermin (Teachers College, Columbia University), Thomas Bailey (Teachers College, Columbia University)

    Supporting College Transitions through Collaborative Programming: A Conceptual Model for Guiding Policy

    2. Stephanie Woodham Burge (Florida State University)

    Declining Sex Segregation in Higher Education: The Role of Early Work and Family Orientations

    3. Rachelle Jeneane Brunn (University of Pennsylvania), Grace Kao (University of Pennsylvania)

    Examining the Black Gender Gap in Post-Secondary Enrollment

    4. James E. Rosenbaum (Northwestern University), Jennifer L. Stephan (Northwestern University)

    College Degree Completion: Institutional Effects and Student Propensity

    PAPER SESSION: COMPARATIVE AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE STATE AND FORMAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Saturday, August 13 from 4:30pm to 6:10pm (Philadelphia Marriott)

    Presider: Mitchell L. Stevens (New York University)

    Discussant: Evan Schofer (University of Minnesota)

    1. Jong-Seon Kim (Stanford University)

    The Normative Construction of Modern Education System: Analysis of Foundings of Educational Ministries and Laws, 1800-2000

    2. Patrick Heuveline (NORC & The University of Chicago)

    Contextual Influences on Educational Achievement: The Family and the State Compared

    3. Creso Franco (Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro), Valerie E. Lee (University of Michigan), Natália Satyro (Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro)

    National Educational Policies and their Consequences for Quality and Equity

    4. Stefan Adessa Wilkens (Univ of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)

    Sorting out the relationship between education and the welfare state: an analysis of 16 OECD countries

    5. David John Frank (University of California, Irvine), John W. Meyer (Stanford University)

    Interpreting Worldwide Expansion and Change in Universities

     

    Invited Session : Add Health: New Educational Data


     Research Workshops

      Time: Sat, Aug 13 - 4:30pm - 6:10pm  

    Sunday, August 14

    PAPER SESSION: PRIMARY EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    Sunday, August 14 from 8:30am to 10:10am (Philadelphia Marriott)

    Presider: Elizabeth H. Souza (Amherst College)

    Discussant: Douglas B. Downey (Ohio State University)

    1. William J. Carbonaro (University of Notre Dame)

    2. Katerina Bodovski (Penn State Univ-University Park), George Farkas (Pennsylvania State University)

    3. Douglas David Ready (University of Oregon), Ron Beghetto (University of Oregon), Laura F. LoGerfo (The Urban Institute)

    4. Kathleen Grove (University of San Diego)

    SOE Session:  Ideology and Institutions: The Case of Schools


    Time: Sun, Aug 14 - 12:30pm - 2:10pm

    SOE Session:  Oppositional Culture: Dynamics Surrounding Race in Schools


    Time: Sun, Aug 14 - 2:30pm - 4:10pm

    Monday, August 15

    SOE Session:  Current Controversies: Gender, Math, and Science

    Time: Mon, Aug 15 - 8:30am - 10:10am

    Informational Poster Session : Research Funding Opportunities and Data Resources
      Time: Mon, Aug 15 - 9:00am - 12:00pm

    Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS), American Institutes for Research, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)

    SOE Session:  Race and Inequality: Looking at Schools

    Time: Mon, Aug 15 - 10:30am - 12:10pm

    SOE Session:  Education through the Life Course


    Time: Mon, Aug 15 - 2:30pm - 4:10pm

    Thematic Session:  Explaining Racial Variations in Educational Achievement


      Time: Mon, Aug 15 - 2:30pm - 4:10pm

    Tuesday, August 16

    SOE Session:  Colleges and Their Consequences

    Time: Tue, Aug 16 - 10:30am - 12:10pm

      SOE Session:  Cultures and Educational Institutions

      Time: Tue, Aug 16 - 2:30pm - 4:10pm

    ===================================================

    2005 ASA SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION SECTION ROUNDTABLES

    ===================================================

    SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 10:30-12:00

    ROUNDTABLE 1: EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND EDUCATION

    1. Susan Dumais*

    Elementary School Students' Extracurricular Activities: The Effects of Participation on "Achievement and Teachers' Evaluations"

    2.Elizabeth Glennie, Elizabeth Stearns, and Domini Castellino

    Girls and Clubs: The Influence of Individual and School Attributes on Extracurricular "Activity Participation"

    3. Susan Cavin, Rhonda Levy, Stuart Pyle, Mark DeGarmo, and Maria Mitchell "Loisada (Lower East Side Story): Dancing Under the Williamsburg Bridge"

    ROUNDTABLE 2: LABOR MARKETS

    1. Lahoma Howard, "Not Married, but not Single - Contrasting the Socio-Economic Experiences of Cohabiting Community College Students with Single, Divorced and Married Students"

    2. Will Tyson, Anna Tolentino, Reginald Lee, Kathryn Borman, and Mary Ann Hanson, "Post-Graduate Educational Attainment of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Majors"

    3. Karen Myers, John Myles*,"Self-Assessed Returns to Adult Education: Life-long Learning and the Educationally Disadvantaged"

    ROUNDTABLE 3: IMMIGRATION AND EDUCATION

    1. Roger Wojtkiewicz*, "Effects of Educational Expectations and Performance on College Graduation for Voluntary and Involuntary Minorities"

    2. William Kandel and Emilio Parrado, "Latino Population Growth and Public 'School Response in the Nuevo South'"

    3. Igor Ryabov, "School Segregation and Academic Achievement of Latino Immigrant Children"

    ROUNDTABLE 4: PEDOGOGY

    1. Scott Davies and Janice Aurini*,"Home Schooling and Canadian Educational Politics: Rights, Pluralism, and Pedagogical Individualism"

    2. Melanie Sberna, "Predicting Teacher Implementation of a Culturally Relevant Pedagogy"

    3. Lindsey Wilkinson, Rebecca Callahan, and Michelle Frisco, "The Impact of High School ESL Course-Taking On The Academic Outcomes of Mexican-American Immigrant Students"

    4. Suellen Butler, "The Sociology of Education: Losing Influence in an Age of Accountability"

    ROUNDTABLE 5: SECONDARY SCHOOL OUTCOMES

    1. Sarah Crissey* ,"Language and Love: The Effects of Dating on Advanced English and Foreign Language Course-Taking in High School"

    2. Sandra Way, "School Discipline and the Differential Likelihood of Graduation for "At-Risk" Students"

    3. Brandy Ellison and William Carbonaro, "The Contribution of High School Experiences to Gender Differences in College Graduation Rates"

    4. Christopher Boccanfuso , "The Effects of Critical Thinking Pedagogy During the Ninth Grade on High School Dropout"

    ROUNDTABLE 6: RACE/ETHNICITY AND SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONS

    1. Donna Harris, "Race and Track Placement: A Multi-Level Analysis"

    2. Cecile David, "Schools, Communities and Demographic Change: Organizational Responses to Population Growth and Changes in Racial Composition"

    3. Susan Iverson*, "The Discursive Construction of Diversity: A Policy Discourse Analysis of U.S. University Diversity Action Plans"

    ROUNDTABLE 7: ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION I

    1. Heather Geraci, "Better Dead than Coed?' Survival and Decline of Single-Sex College in the United States"

    2. Sarah Damaske*, "Unmarketable' College Graduates: The Transition from School to Work in a College Career Center"

    3. Ruth Turley and Matthew Desmond, "Contributions to College Costs by Married and Divorced Parents"

    4. Gordon Chang and Colin Ong-Dean, "The 'High-Fee, High-Loan' Model of Student Finance in U.S. Higher Education: Consequences for Low-Income Students"

    5. Glenn Muschert , "Pop Music in the Classroom: Further Exploration of Its Use in Courses on Crime"

    ROUNDTABLE 8: SOCIAL CAPITAL IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLING

    1. Courtney Bell, "All Choices Created Equal? The Role of Choice Sets in the Selection of "Failing" Schools"

    2. Brian Colwell, "Forms of Capital, Extracurricular Activities, and Employment Outcomes for High School Graduates"

    3. Mart? Santos, "Reopening the Debate on Social Capital: Parental Intergenerational Closure, School Racial Composition, and Math Achievement. A Multilevel Approach"

    4. David Sikkink and Brooke Fischer*, "Religious Tradition, Family Size, and Educational Attainment"

    ROUNDTABLE 9: SOCIAL CAPITAL IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    1. Noga Admon, "Social Capital and the Hispanic Community College student"

    2. Doo Hwan Kim, "Aligning Action and Promoting Complementary Ties: School Support in Adolescents\\\' Transition to Postsecondary Education"

    3. Cynthia Bogard*, "Producing Social Capital at the University"

    4. Buffy Smith, "Unveiling the Hidden Curriculum of Higher Education Through the Academic Mentoring Process"

    ROUNDTABLE 10: ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION II

    1. Beverly Lindsay and Tara Scales, "Cultural Observances at American University Campuses: Juxtaposing Indigenous Domestic and International Values"

    2. Robert Saute*, "The Economics of Career Decisions for Students Considering Public Interest Law"

    3. Jiannbin Shiao and Mia Tuan, "The Institutional Context of Campus Diversity: The Case of Korean Adoptees in Early Adulthood"

    4. Rebecca Tippett, "Using Social Networks Methods to Examine Student Experiences in Higher Education"

    5. Jonathan Hill, "Higher Education and Change in Religious Belief and Practice: A Longitudinal Analysis"

    ROUNDTABLE 11: RACE/ETHNICITY AND ACHIEVEMENT

    1. Amy Lutz*, "Biliteracy and Latino Students' Educational Achievement"

    2. Grace Kao and Jamie Doyle, "Educational Achievement and School Attachment among Multiracial Adolescents"

    3. Hedwig Lee, "The Effects of School Racial and Ethnic Composition on Academic Achievement in Adolescence"

    ROUNDTABLE 12: GENDER AND EDUCATION I

    1. Edward Morris*, "Ladies' or 'Loudies'? Perceptions and Expectations of Black Girls in Classrooms"

    2. Jodi Cohen, "Girls Learning Alone: Social transgression and a single-sex math classroom"

    3. Amrita Pande, "Intra-household Resource Allocation in India: Is there a mother daughter link?"

    ROUNDTABLE 13: EDUCATION IN ASIA

    1. Ying-Shan Wei, "Gender Inequality and the Opportunity for Children's Schooling in Taiwan"

    2. Jianying Wang*, "Political Capital and Educational Inequality in China"

    3. Xiaojiong Ding, "The Historical Development of Private Education in Mainland China"

    ROUNDTABLE 14: EDUCATION REFORM

    1. Elizabeth Useem and Ruth Neild, "Can Large Urban Districts Find and Keep "Highly Qualified" Teachers? Lessons ,from Philadelphia"

    2. Benjamin Dalton*, "New Charter Schools in New York: Race and the Conservative Alliance"

    3. Julia Gwynne, "Opting Out or Staying In: School Choice in Chicago Public High Schools"

    4. Ann Shelly and Robert Shelly, "Cognitive Behavior, Cognitive Development, and Emergence of Inequality in Learning Groups: Implications for the Classroom"

    ROUNDTABLE 15: SPECIAL EDUCATION

    1. Sarah OKeefe, "Just a Bunch of SPEDS': Resistance to Disability and Alternative School Dropout, Pushout, and Fadeout"

    2. Colin Ong-Dean*, "Heard? Due Process Hearings in Special Education"

    ROUNDTABLE 16: ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON EDUCATION OUTCOMES

    1. Denise Kall and Marie Lynn Miranda, "The Impact of Lead on Children's Educational Outcomes"

    2. Jessica Kenty-Drane*, "Disproportionate Exposure to Neighborhood Disorder and School Violence for Black First-Graders in U.S. Public Schools"

    3. Torin Monahan, "The Surveillance Curriculum: Risk Management and Social Control in the Neoliberal School"

    ROUNDTABLE 17: GENDER AND EDUCATION II

    1. Lisa Nunn*, "Measuring Up as Men: Hegemonic Masculinity's Foothold in School Structures"

    2. Shannon Cavanagh and Catherine Riegle-Crumb, "Transitions and Trajectories: Early Pubertal Timing and Girls' Academic Careers"

    ROUNDTABLE 18: COMPARATIVE EDUCATION POLICY

    1. Floyd Hammack*, "Legislation or Litigation for Educational Exclusion and Accommodation: New York and San Francisco Compared"

    2. Stephanie Arnett, "Consequences of Social Organization and Government Policy for Equality of Educational Opportunity: A Cross-national Comparison"

    3. Marc Verboord and Kees Van Rees, "Institutional contexts and the literary education curriculum"

    ROUNDTABLE 19: CULTURE AND EDUCATION

    1. Kyle Siler*, "Whither Disciplines? Consequences and Functions of the Disciplinary Organization of Knowedge in Academia"

    2. Nicholas Pagnucco, "Competing Narrations of Service Learning within the Chronicle of Higher Education"

    3. Sarah Jones, "Locating School Culture in Everyday Interactions"

    Announcements

    1. Barbara Schneider will assume the editorship of Sociology of Education on January 1, 2006. As of July 1, 2005, submit all new manuscripts to her at the following address:

    Barbara Schneider, Editor

    Sociology of Education

    University of Chicago

    1155 East 60th Street, Room 369

    Chicago, IL 60637
    b-schneider@uchicago.edu

     

    Until September 30, 2005, send revisions of manuscripts that were initially submitted before July 1, 2005 to

    Karl Alexander, Editor

    Sociology of Education

    Department of Sociology

    Johns Hopkins University

    Baltimore, MD 21218

    e-mail: Karl@jhu.edu

     

     

    2. Congratulations to Regina Deil-Amen, Stefanie DeLuca, and Eric Grodsky for receiving NAE/Spencer awards. As Jim Rosenbaum notes, “ It isn ' t often that sociologists get them, and it is tribute to our field. ”

    3. After toiling hard with Rob Warren to organize the Section's ASA sessions, Amy Binder will not get to enjoy the product of those labors. Amy got a fellowship at the Rockefeller Foundation villa in Bellagio, Italy for the month of August. We congratulate her.



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